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Blog

Welcome to the Rural Arisings Blog.Take a look at what we have achieved at the Belhus & Cranleigh sites

Location

It is named 'The Hidden Wilds of the Motorway' and will be broadcast on BBC 4 at 9pm with Helen Macdonald presenting. The section on Little Belhus will be quite near the end and will feature some scenery and invertebrates found on the day, so…

A new species to the park and an Essex Red Listed species (threatened in Essex) has just been found by a volunteer surveyor. This little fellow is Marpissa muscosa, aka fence post jumping spider. Don't worry though they are tiny and…

We are pleased to be part of the Considerate Constructors Scheme and are proud to have just received our site report which gives us scores of 'very good' to 'exceptional' across all categories.

The categories are:…

A very big thank you to Grant and his family for planting 105 trees in the park. These trees will help wildlife thrive and contribute to improving the local environment for many decades to come. If you would like to do the same you can order some…

Three aerial photographs showing the North Field between 2014 and 2016 as viewed from above the M25 - the western boundary of the park.
Between 2014 and 2015 we can see the disappearance of the haul roads and the appearance of the perimeter…

The Epping Forest Conservation Volunteers helped out at Little Belhus by planting up a 1 hectare scrub area Dec 2016. The scrub will add habitat diversity as it will be in addition to the woodland and wildflower habitats already present in the…

A Thurrock Enquirer article about Dilkes Academy naming the big lake at Little Belhus Country Park. Pupils from the school had fun making a mosiac of the lakes new name, and a butterfly mosiac which we will be displaying on our Skip Garden…

A Privet hawkmoth which flew into our work site. We rescued it and put it on an Ash tree (one of its food plants). It is one of the largest hawk moths and you can just make out its pink and black body in the first photo.
 

You may need to get your eye in to see them all!

Even in the midst of winter there are incredible looking species to be found

King Alfred's Cakes (looks like something else?!) found on perimeter hibernacula.
These non-edible fungi are so named because legend has it that King Alfred, when in hiding from battle, forgot to take his cakes out of the oven and they…